What’s the difference between a user story and a requirement?

I am often asked this when delivering training on writing requirements. The most obvious difference is semantics. A user story is generally written as a statement of something a user wants to do with a system and for what purpose. For example:

I want to find clothing that is my size.

While a requirement statement is traditionally written in a more formal style, starting with “The system shall” Continue reading

Getting the Horse to Drink

Lack of stakeholder and user involvement is often cited as a primary reason for project failure and the greatest source of project risk. Unfortunately, whether you adhere to an Agile, traditional, hybrid or mixed methology, getting and keeping customers involved in the development process is always a challenge. I explained previously that the most common reasons customers state for not being involved are that they are too busy, they don’t trust the technical team’s ability to deliver, and that they don’t see the meetings as productive.

The first reason is generally beyond a project manager’s control, and the second is a lack of trust between stakeholders and IT that is often Continue reading

Honey, Vinegar, and Customer Participation

Recently I participated in a series of instructor-led online courses on Scrum/Agile. During the section on Sprint Planning, the instructor mentioned that shorter iterations provide more agility, and organizations should aim to achieve weekly sprints. This prompted one student to ask:

“The business people I need won’t attend my monthly meetings. How can I get them to attend a weekly planning meeting?”

This is one of the most common complaints or questions I receive, so it was no surprise that a student asked it here. However, what did surprise me was the instructor’s response:

“Tell them that if they don’t participate they can expect the software to be buggy and not meet their needs.”

I have witnessed this sort of approach before, but I was shocked at this answer from someone who claimed to be an expert in Agile. It contradicts the fundamental principals described in the Agile Manifesto: Continue reading

Flattened Requirements Management

 (Originally posted here January 13th, 2012)

In 2003, Thomas Friedman wrote in The World is Flat how ten factors, which he called ‘Flatteners,’ have converged to create a more level playing field in terms of doing business, making it much easier for organizations in developing countries to compete with developed world companies in a number of industries. One of the flatteners is supply-chaining, which he describes as “a method of collaborating horizontally – among suppliers, retailers and customers – to create value.”

He predicted that in order for organizations to succeed in this flattened world, they need to learn to work closer and more collaboratively with their suppliers. Continue reading