Why the MVP method is hard – Technical

This is the 4th and last post in the series about why the MVP method, as described by Eric Ries in The Lean Startup, is more challenging than it first appears. Many organisations, large and small, refer to it. In fact it’s sometimes hard to find product road maps or project plans that don’t make reference to an “MVP.” However, few are able to apply even the most basic tenets of the MVP method, and instead fall back on traditional development paradigms which results in what I call the MPP.

Previous posts discussed the organisational and personal obstacles to applying the method. Let’s look at the technical challenges. I find this is something that is often glossed over, Continue reading

Why the MVP method is hard – Organizational challenges

In my previous post I talked about how the MVP method is very frequently referenced but rarely used. Organizations usually use the word Minimum Viable Product when they develop what I refer to as the Maximum Possible Product, where the features for the product are defined up front and then as many of those features as possible are delivered before a deadline or within a budget. They do this because the MVP method that Eric Ries describes is not as easy as it sounds.

Probably the most difficult obstacle to the MVP method is the structure, values and history of the organization itself. Certain very common characteristics can make it next to impossible to execute a project that emphasizes testing, learning and changing direction based on feedback. Let’s talk about three of these characteristics.

The most common organizational barrier I see is focusing on avoiding project failure, sometimes referred to as “front loading.” For example Continue reading

MVP versus MPP

The big buzzword these days seems to be MVP, meaning Minimum Viable Product. It’s a reference to the approach to product development described by Eric Ries in his book The Lean Startup. However, while I’ve been hearing and seeing the term MVP a lot, I’ve almost never seen anyone executing the process that Eric Ries describes.

More often than not, what is called MVP is what I call MPP, or Maximum Possible Product. The word Possible has a double meaning: Continue reading